Search found 186 matches

by Garth
Fri Jun 21, 2019 12:36 am
Forum: General Stuff
Topic: ISPs making home servers impossible (port blocking)
Replies: 20
Views: 16721

Re: ISPs making home servers impossible (port blocking)

I'm paying $60/year at Digital Ocean ($5 a month price for basic hosting service): https://www.digitalocean.com/pricing/ . Running our son's server (where my site was originally hosted) costs three times that much just for electricity (although our residential electric rates here is SoCal are high, ...
by Garth
Mon May 27, 2019 6:59 pm
Forum: General Stuff
Topic: Technology-related stuff that stays the same in long-term
Replies: 17
Views: 14205

Re: Technology-related stuff that stays the same in long-ter

Near where I worked around 1990 there was a truck-repair place. To save the labor cost, truckers would often buy parts there and do their own repairs out on the street, parked nearby. I used to go out for a walk at lunch time, and sometimes got to talk to them. One time there was a flatbed with a co...
by Garth
Mon May 27, 2019 1:51 pm
Forum: General Stuff
Topic: Technology-related stuff that stays the same in long-term
Replies: 17
Views: 14205

Re: Technology-related stuff that stays the same in long-ter

The oldest playable pipe organ was made in the 11th century. The keyboard is the same as our modern keyboard. Yeah, but back then another person had to pump the air into the organ (or the player had to do it with his feet), today a small electric motor does this job. Organists' feet were busy with ...
by Garth
Mon May 27, 2019 12:14 pm
Forum: General Stuff
Topic: Technology-related stuff that stays the same in long-term
Replies: 17
Views: 14205

Re: Technology-related stuff that stays the same in long-ter

Bikes. Sure, they got disk brakes and other new fancy stuff, but often this is optional. You can use a 50-year old bike and, assuming you replaced the parts that needed replacement, it'll still work great today, and - as opposed to 50-year old car - nobody will immediately notice how old the bike i...
by Garth
Mon May 27, 2019 11:50 am
Forum: General Stuff
Topic: Information on WDC's vaporware 32bit 65xx CPU?
Replies: 11
Views: 9981

Re: Information on WDC's vaporware 32bit 65xx CPU?

No; the point would have been to make a machine (let's call it an Apple IIx for the sake of discussion) which can, while multitasking, run 32-bit IIx programs,at the same time with II GS programs that have not been recompiled for the new processor, at the same time with 8-bit Apple II programs whic...
by Garth
Mon May 27, 2019 12:43 am
Forum: General Stuff
Topic: Information on WDC's vaporware 32bit 65xx CPU?
Replies: 11
Views: 9981

Re: Information on WDC's vaporware 32bit 65xx CPU?

You're wanting information on the incomplete W65T32, or the 65C832 . It's a 65C816-compatible CPU. Read: it offers no new general-purpose registers (still stuck with A/X/Y), just that they can be 8/16/24/32-bit. You don't get any new instructions (still no bloody mul/div), no new addressing modes, ...
by Garth
Fri May 24, 2019 9:33 pm
Forum: General Stuff
Topic: Information on WDC's vaporware 32bit 65xx CPU?
Replies: 11
Views: 9981

Re: Information on WDC's vaporware 32bit 65xx CPU?

The impression I had (I don't have any references, maybe Garth would know) was that the 65C832 may have been planned around the same time as the 65C816, and that the W65T32 "Terbium" was something else from a later time. I just remember back when I was first learning about 6502 stuff, this Terbium ...
by Garth
Fri May 10, 2019 6:14 pm
Forum: General Stuff
Topic: "Modern compilers will outperform handwritten assembly."
Replies: 19
Views: 14319

Re: "Modern compilers will outperform handwritten assembly."

I suspect the idea that compilers can outperform handwritten assembly comes from modern 32- and 64-bit multi-core high-end processors that have super-complex instructions, deep pipelines that must be kept full, multi-level cache, out-of order execution, and things that simply don't apply to the 650...
by Garth
Fri May 10, 2019 1:54 pm
Forum: General Stuff
Topic: "Modern compilers will outperform handwritten assembly."
Replies: 19
Views: 14319

Re: "Modern compilers will outperform handwritten assembly."

I suspect the idea that compilers can outperform handwritten assembly comes from modern 32- and 64-bit multi-core high-end processors that have super-complex instructions, deep pipelines that must be kept full, multi-level cache, out-of order execution, and things that simply don't apply to the 6502...
by Garth
Sat May 04, 2019 5:40 pm
Forum: General Stuff
Topic: website builder
Replies: 2
Views: 16015

Re: website builder

I have a voluminous 6502 website , all written with a plain text editor, directly in html. HTML's basics are pretty simple, and most people here are probably interested in programming anyway. I have made up a couple of cheat sheets for myself, for the tags and special characters I use sometimes but ...
by Garth
Sun Apr 07, 2019 8:54 pm
Forum: General Stuff
Topic: What have you learnt most from programming in assembly?
Replies: 28
Views: 21429

Re: What have you learnt most from programming in assembly?

Efficiency, something I'm a bit OCD about. I have taken things from HLLs and applied them to assembly, like my program flow-control structure macros . (There are a couple of extended examples near the end of the page in my multitasking article , and I tell more of how the innards of the macros const...
by Garth
Tue Mar 05, 2019 8:48 pm
Forum: NESdev
Topic: have you ever used recursion on the NES?
Replies: 23
Views: 11264

Re: have you ever used recursion on the NES?

I have hardly used it. Section 15 of my 6502 stacks treatise is about recursion though, at http://wilsonminesco.com/stacks/recurse.html . It naturally follows section 14 which is about local variables and environments. What is funny about recursion is that the examples to show how amazing this is a...
by Garth
Mon Mar 04, 2019 10:37 pm
Forum: NESdev
Topic: have you ever used recursion on the NES?
Replies: 23
Views: 11264

Re: have you ever used recursion on the NES?

I'm not sure this is really a "NES thing" but moreso a general "have you ever used recursion on the 6502, and if so, to solve what thing?" question. But an excellent question BTW. I remember using recursion in a couple ways in a IIGS demo I worked on, but I can't remember exactly for what. I just r...
by Garth
Sun Mar 03, 2019 10:31 pm
Forum: Newbie Help Center
Topic: A few quick programming questions
Replies: 3
Views: 6618

Re: A few quick programming questions

ect. Indexed Indirect addressing is hardly used by anyone. Most 6502 programmers even question the reason for its existence at one point or another. You got it right, though. It lets you use a table of pointers in ZP, but the only real world example of that being useful that most NES programmers ca...
by Garth
Thu Feb 21, 2019 6:50 pm
Forum: General Stuff
Topic: The Difficulty of ARM Assembly
Replies: 57
Views: 27051

Re: The Difficulty of ARM Assembly

TmEE wrote:Assembler is supposed to be the thing that turns code into program, not the code itself...
Right. "Assembler" is what the tool is called. The language is "assembly language," not "assembler." The constant misuse of terms does bother me.