kitty's catch push start screen

Discuss technical or other issues relating to programming the Nintendo Entertainment System, Famicom, or compatible systems.

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kitty's catch push start screen

Post by log in » Sun Dec 18, 2011 11:04 am

I just got myself a powerpak and i use it the most for playing prototypes and testing homebrew.
1 of the games 1 played is kitty's catch a game that was made by a gametek/tengen programmer in his free time.
That he tried to sell but it never got sold.
ANYWAY..

The starting screen baffled me.
The push start screen transforms in the playing screen.
Something i have never seen before in nes games.

How do you call this technik? Is it a 1 screen game or is it in fact multiple screens?
im a newbie,lets see how far i can get

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Post by Shiru » Sun Dec 18, 2011 11:13 am

No game dump seems to be available for public, not even a video, so it is going to be diffucult to answer to your question.

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Post by tokumaru » Sun Dec 18, 2011 12:08 pm

Like Shiru said, there doesn't seem to be anything about this game online, so it will be hard to make an actual analysis. What you described sounds a lot like SMB1 though... When you press start at the title screen, there's a black screen that shows how many lives you got before the gameplay starts, but there's no such screen between the title and the demo, so the title screen does become the level.

If that's the kind of thing you're talking about, there are no special tricks involved. The level engine could run right from the start, rendering the first scene immediately, and then "pause" the game and modify the screen slightly so that it becomes the title screen. Once start is pressed, gameplay resumes. This is the most straightforward way I can think of to accomplish this.

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Post by log in » Sun Dec 18, 2011 12:37 pm

http://nintendoagemedia.com/_usermedia/ ... 20Best.nes

here you go..not a bad game if you think its made by 1 guy and in 1989,its 2 player only btw.
im a newbie,lets see how far i can get

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Post by tokumaru » Sun Dec 18, 2011 12:50 pm

The music in this game is so annoying! Game's kinda bad for something on the NES... it plays more like an Atari 2600 game IMO.

Anyway, there's nothing really special about the screen transition... it just draws the game screen progressively, instead of all at once. Much like you are able to animate individual objects in a game, you can also animate screen transitions like these... Just do a little bit every frame, instead of all at once.

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Post by log in » Sun Dec 18, 2011 3:50 pm

tokumaru wrote:The music in this game is so annoying! Game's kinda bad for something on the NES... it plays more like an Atari 2600 game IMO.

Anyway, there's nothing really special about the screen transition... it just draws the game screen progressively, instead of all at once. Much like you are able to animate individual objects in a game, you can also animate screen transitions like these... Just do a little bit every frame, instead of all at once.
I found the game ok ,but thats because i compaired it with escape from atlantis another solo programmer game that didn't got released.
Find the rom if you havent played it for some real annoying music.

I found the screen transition cooler then a normal start sreen to playing screen transition. But thats just me :wink:
I wonder why the programmer would use this style for his game instead of the 'normal' transition? :roll: Is it more easy to program or harder?
Its unusual for nes games.
im a newbie,lets see how far i can get

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Post by Shiru » Sun Dec 18, 2011 4:26 pm

Not easier for sure. He probably thought that it is cooler that way.

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Post by Kasumi » Sun Dec 18, 2011 4:37 pm

It's probably only a little harder.

A lot of neat things you seen in modern games are unusual in NES games, just because no one had thought of them. I don't think it usually had much to do with how difficult they would have been.

For instance, compare Nintendo's version of Tetris with LJ65 by Tepples. LJ65 contains a lot of neat gameplay mechanics that weren't impossible on NES. They just hadn't been thought of yet.

See also: The evolution of Megaman games. Megaman 3 added the slide attack, Megaman 4 added the charge shot. Every earlier Megaman game probably could have had these techniques (they probably weren't too tough to add), but they just hadn't been thought of yet.

But if I as a homebrew developer wanted to make a game like Megaman, I wouldn't have to think of these things because they have been in another game. So I could add them straight away.

Another thing in a lot of older NES games is using select to pick the modes. It is more intuitive now to use up+down on the d-pad, but no one had done that yet!

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Post by tepples » Sun Dec 18, 2011 7:37 pm

Kasumi wrote:A lot of neat things you seen in modern games are unusual in NES games, just because no one had thought of them.
Which is one of the things that made "Hong Kong Original" pirate ports of 16-bit games possible. See the lead of my article about NES limitations.
For instance, compare Nintendo's version of Tetris with LJ65 by Tepples. LJ65 contains a lot of neat gameplay mechanics that weren't impossible on NES. They just hadn't been thought of yet.
Hard drop and color per piece were already in Tetris 3.12 for PC. Fast sideways motion, lock delay, and the predecessor to Bottom rotation were already in Sega's arcade Tetris. Side-by-side play and even a rudimentary wall kick had shown up in Tengen's version. But it took Arika to put all the pieces together and refine the formula.
Another thing in a lot of older NES games is using select to pick the modes. It is more intuitive now to use up+down on the d-pad, but no one had done that yet!
That and early games borrowed user interface conventions from arcade games, which had separate buttons to start 1-player and 2-player games, and the choice between "GAME A" and "GAME B" was a DIP switch.

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