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PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2017 9:51 am 
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Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 8:38 pm
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Location: Fukuoka, Japan
Finally received the Raspberry PI 3 at work with a small kit of sensors so we can build some IOT related test for an internal project. Since I will have to build the samples, know very little about electronics, and have a little bit of time head of building them, I decided that I should try to learn a little bit more then I know right now (which is not much) so I won't break it by accident. The other reason it now I have a "why" to use electronics parts, it does have an impact on the motivation.

Everything is new so it's quite exciting (didn't felt that way in a while) so I got an extra breadboard today, a few led, a battery based power source (3v) and some extra cables so I can start slowly with some basic circuits without the PI. I already did a simple led and learned about the use of resistors, figured out how to use a tack switch and now my next target will be a Potentiometer. All the parts that came in the kit have no explanation so I have to search about them, which make me learn at the same time.

My question is what kind of small circuits I should build with a breadboard to learn about basic electronics and the things you have to be careful about, like the need for a resistor for the led because voltage is not the same, how to make the same strength for all led (tried to put them serially but one of them seemed weaker) etc.

For now I didn't do much but I really find that interesting and fun. Got interest in the arduino too. Maybe later once I learned about the basics.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2017 11:31 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 13, 2008 11:12 am
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Location: Seattle
Not exactly answering the question:
I've found the following books to be really helpful:
* Practical Electronics for Inventors by Scherz (brings the reader all the way from "what is electronics" to rudimentary ability to design simple things)

* Handbook of Modern Sensors by Fraden (heavy on analog design for providing good clean signals out of parts; many modern modern sensors include their own ADC because this is so easy to do wrong)
* Mechanical Measurements by Beckwith, Buck, and Marangoni (more or less the same)


Simple circuits that might be interesting:
* Potentiometer-controlled LED brightness
** done once without the RasPi involved, and then again using the RasPi to fake an ADC and one of the PWM outputs to drive the LED

* Simple transistor-based LED blinkers (wikimedia; another)

* The entire Logic Noise set of articles on Hackaday

* The rest of the sample circuits on Die Elektroniker Seite


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2017 11:31 am 
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Formerly WheelInventor

Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2016 2:55 am
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Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Not necessarily electronics, but check out the basic circuits section of this page for confidence boosting projects like amps, filters, gates http://www.doepfer.de/DIY/a100_diy.htm

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http://www.frankengraphics.com - personal NES blog


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2017 5:30 pm 
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Location: Fukuoka, Japan
@lidnariq

It may not be related directly but it is very valuable information so I'm more than grateful for the books references and sites. I'm sure this information will come in handy and I thank you again. I still need to figure out your comment in another thread about the Raspberry PI and possible v3.3 issue while writing eeprom. Maybe it will become clearer once I use the terminal and learn about the fundamental of this platform.

@WheelInventor

Great, thanks for the link. I did a quick scan and one place they show a potentionmeter so I may be able to figure out the pin-out from that page and find other useful information since there is all kind of diagrams that will be interesting to learn about.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2017 10:02 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 28, 2013 5:49 am
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Location: Sweden
I've been using http://www.electronics-tutorials.com/ba ... ronics.htm for filling in the basics I never learned in school. There's also electronic projects over there.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2017 8:53 am 
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Location: Fukuoka, Japan
@Pokun:

Thanks for the link, I will check it too.

@lidnariq

For the first book mentioned (Practical Electronics for Inventor), a new edition (4th) came out in 2016. Does it make much a difference? I guess it would be the easiest one to get in Japan from Amazon.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2017 11:32 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 13, 2008 11:12 am
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Location: Seattle
The copy I have on my shelf is actually the 2nd edition. Searching around online, the later editions contain fixes to errata and apparently the 4th edition also added a chapter on using FPGAs.


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