Loss of interest for computer scinence, anyone else ?

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Bregalad
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Loss of interest for computer scinence, anyone else ?

Post by Bregalad » Fri Mar 26, 2021 3:22 am

So guys it's hard to explain but I wonder if any other of my nesdev mates experienced something similar as I do these last years.

Since I'm a young teenager (11-ish) I've been interested in computers, coding, etc... and decided to make it both a hobby and a living of it. But since the last 2-3 years or so I find it more and more boring, in a way that's hard to explain with words (even even moreso in English as a French-speaker). It's hard to put a finger on what exactly is going wrong, nevertheless I'll make an attempt :
  • No interest on working on someone else's projects rather than mine (even if I'm paid well)
  • Feel like I've leanred all that I could learn and would rather spend time learning something on another topic rather than "apply" what I've learned about IT/CS.
  • Modern software developement lack any hardware tricks or challenge there is on retro platforms
  • Modern software development is too abstract and far to the hardware - on the other hand modern hardware is too miniaturized and too complex to be understandable and to be played with
  • It's not motivating to contribute to something that is too complex so I don't understand the big picture of
  • It's not motivating to contribute to something that is going to trash a few years later at best
  • It might be that entering in my 30s my center of interests simply change due to my own aging
Has anyone else experienced something similar (I'm looking at you Koitsu)? If so did you switch for another job, and if so what career path did you take? Or have you found a way to re-interest yourself in computer science by changing directions within this diverse field?

(Edit : To make it clear I'm talking about a long-term, year-scale loss of interest, not something that might just happen for a couple of weeks that anyone can naturally experience)
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Re: Loss of interest for computer scinence, anyone else ?

Post by tokumaru » Fri Mar 26, 2021 6:12 am

I definitely regretted chosing computer science as a career path. I got into this field because I liked the challenge of making computers do things, but 99% of the coding positions nowadays are for boring repetitive stuff that doesn't really require you too solve any problems or actually use your brain, most of the time you're just writing glue code to make stuff that other people wrote work together.

That being said, I didn't lose interest in the things that got me into coding in the first place, I still enjoy low-level game programming very much, as well as data compression and lots of other things that actually require you to think while coding, it's just that there's little demand for that in the real world, where people just want to get their frankenstein products out of the door as fast as possible.

I have tried to stay away from regular software development jobs, but I did end up having to do it a few times and it was never rewarding or satisfying. The other thing I can do reasonably well that has allowed me to avoid traditional coding jobs is graphical design and illustration. That is so much more rewarding than modern programming. I also worked as a teacher for a few years, doing STEAM activities with kids, where I used my coding skills to write little games and tools to use in class, and that was pretty cool.

I have no problem working on other people's projects if there are things about them that I find interesting.

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Re: Loss of interest for computer scinence, anyone else ?

Post by 93143 » Fri Mar 26, 2021 3:28 pm

As a computational fluid dynamicist, I'm somewhat insulated from the worst trends in modern computing. But when I look at the business as a somewhat informed outsider, it does appear less interesting and more dysfunctional than one would hope. (Also, my laptop is from 2008 and came back from servicing with half the RAM gone, so when ordinary tasks like viewing PDFs are ridiculously bloated, I notice...)

I do find that programming the SNES and Super FX is interesting to me in a way that modern programming isn't, not even C++/emacs/git/make with no GUI or "user experience" to worry about. The SNES is bare metal. No OS. No BIOS, really (except for the APU boot ROM, which is relatively inoffensive). Simple tools, and if you don't like what someone else wrote - or you have an idea no one's implemented yet - it's easy enough to make your own. You aren't beholden to what some other programmer thought was a good idea. If the hardware is physically capable of doing something, I can make it do that thing. The whole system is simple enough for one person to understand, and since it's an historical artifact already, you can take as long as you want to get to grips with it; there's no pressure to 'keep pace with progress'. You can't really say any of that about modern computing.

(On the other hand, I really do like Matlab/Octave. It makes a great scratch pad, and is very intuitive and user-friendly. But with Matlab it's never a question of making the computer do something cool; it's a matter of working out an approach to a problem. It's a great research and development tool, and it's great for processing moderate amounts of data in unusual ways. You would never program a game in Matlab.)

I keep thinking that it would be cool to start a business making SNES games with a small team of dedicated enthusiasts. But I'm not at all sure the market is there for the sort of projects I want to do, and I fear that once it became my job I'd lose interest (or perhaps being forced to finish something would drain my enthusiasm). On the other hand, my projects list is now so long that if it stays a hobby I'm guaranteed to never finish it without medical life extension/anti-aging technology...

...

I don't know how programmers are trained nowadays, but I wonder if it would be useful to start them with assembly on really primitive hardware (punch cards?), and not let them touch C until they've understood how compilers work. Introduce Java (if at all) via a deep dive into the interpreter...

That reminds me of a silly/impractical idea I had for introducing kids to video games via the Atari 2600, then NES, then SNES/MD, N64/PSX, and so forth, on a somewhat compressed schedule. Then I read a Penny Arcade strip where Tycho does exactly that...

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Re: Loss of interest for computer scinence, anyone else ?

Post by Ben Boldt » Fri Mar 26, 2021 9:23 pm

I think it's easy to say that something got boring and you don't like it anymore. When that happens it is important to ask, what would you rather do, and why don't you do it instead? And is this feeling anything to do with work-life balance? Maybe it is the things outside of work that need improvement and work can remain the place to relax.

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Re: Loss of interest for computer scinence, anyone else ?

Post by Bregalad » Sat Mar 27, 2021 5:18 am

Thanks guys, like always on Nesdev it's great to know I can count on you guys !

The thing is that, I might be wrong, but it's probably not a simple "Oh I liked this as a hobby but I hate this as a job" thing. Although they interested me less I was still interested somehow in high-level programming and in things such as Java and Python, but this stopped since then. So my interest in all kind of programming dropped, interest in low-level programming changed from passionate to not very interesting, and interest to high-level programming changed from quite interesting to barely interesting.
tokumaru wrote:
Fri Mar 26, 2021 6:12 am
I definitely regretted chosing computer science as a career path. I got into this field because I liked the challenge of making computers do things, but 99% of the coding positions nowadays are for boring repetitive stuff that doesn't really require you too solve any problems or actually use your brain, most of the time you're just writing glue code to make stuff that other people wrote work together.
Ok thanks for this information, acutally I don't know enough about the market to have an opinion on the matter, but this makes sense.
I have no problem working on other people's projects if there are things about them that I find interesting.
Maybe it's just harder for me to find someone else's project interesting that it is for you?
Ben Boldt wrote:
Fri Mar 26, 2021 9:23 pm
I think it's easy to say that something got boring and you don't like it anymore.
That's exactly why I'd like to have a more in depth understanding of what's going on and why I loose interest in things I used to love.
Ben Boldt wrote:
Fri Mar 26, 2021 9:23 pm
When that happens it is important to ask, what would you rather do, and why don't you do it instead?
I have several other ideas, the thing is to know what exactly is demaded on the market which is always difficult. As someone who have very low to none charisma, it's particularly important that I do something that is very highly demanded, and do it very well, to compensate for this.
Ben Boldt wrote:
Fri Mar 26, 2021 9:23 pm
And is this feeling anything to do with work-life balance? Maybe it is the things outside of work that need improvement and work can remain the place to relax.
Don't worry, I always was more active outside of work/scool than within it ;)
It's true, because of covid-19, much of the activities I used to do outside of work, especially playing music, are missing and that's though for me. I do not think this is the cause of my loss of interest for Computer Science or IT because that already started before the pandemic actually.
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Re: Loss of interest for computer scinence, anyone else ?

Post by Drag » Sat Mar 27, 2021 5:56 pm

I bounce back and forth between like 10 hobbies, not all are CS/programming related, so my interest waxes and wanes, but I'll always return to programming or technology at some point, even if it's a year later. (My activity patterns on Nesdev can prove it happens too :P)

And yeah, programming isn't always going to be glamorous demoscene things like cramming extra colors on screen or doing fancy hardware tricks. Sometimes, the satisfying challenge challenge is from designing the architecture the program's going to use to do something really basic, or successfully finding and integrating a library. The challenge is sometimes just getting your stuff to work at all.

As much as I'd love a job that I can flex all of my hobbyist interests in, there just aren't any, so the programming day-job is going to seem boring or repetitive, but if you can find one that pays well and gives you options for remote work, you should try going for it for the stable income and healthcare, and then you can pretend you'll have enough energy to do stuff in your spare time, like me! :D

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Re: Loss of interest for computer scinence, anyone else ?

Post by psycopathicteen » Sun Mar 28, 2021 7:58 am

Yeah, I used to think programming on an older game system like the SNES would be easy, but I learned the hard way that it isn't. Especially since I rarely have any quietness in my house, with dad watching Tucker Carlson whine about Dr. Seuss.

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Re: Loss of interest for computer scinence, anyone else ?

Post by Bregalad » Mon Mar 29, 2021 2:26 am

psycopathicteen wrote:
Sun Mar 28, 2021 7:58 am
Yeah, I used to think programming on an older game system like the SNES would be easy, but I learned the hard way that it isn't.
Being interested in something has nothing to do with it being easy or hard ! On the other hand, something being somehow "hard" is necessary to make it interesting at all.
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Re: Loss of interest for computer scinence, anyone else ?

Post by Nikku4211 » Mon Mar 29, 2021 7:25 am

Bregalad wrote:
Fri Mar 26, 2021 3:22 am
Since I'm a young teenager (11-ish) I've been interested in computers, coding, etc... and decided to make it both a hobby and a living of it. But since the last 2-3 years or so I find it more and more boring, in a way that's hard to explain with words (even even moreso in English as a French-speaker). It's hard to put a finger on what exactly is going wrong, nevertheless I'll make an attempt :
  • No interest on working on someone else's projects rather than mine (even if I'm paid well)
  • Feel like I've leanred all that I could learn and would rather spend time learning something on another topic rather than "apply" what I've learned about IT/CS.
  • Modern software developement lack any hardware tricks or challenge there is on retro platforms
  • Modern software development is too abstract and far to the hardware - on the other hand modern hardware is too miniaturized and too complex to be understandable and to be played with
  • It's not motivating to contribute to something that is too complex so I don't understand the big picture of
  • It's not motivating to contribute to something that is going to trash a few years later at best
  • It might be that entering in my 30s my center of interests simply change due to my own aging
Has anyone else experienced something similar (I'm looking at you Koitsu)? If so did you switch for another job, and if so what career path did you take? Or have you found a way to re-interest yourself in computer science by changing directions within this diverse field?
I've had that same feeling many times.

I've been into the SNES hardware since I was a 4 year old in 2007, since I played plenty of SNES games on SNES9x(did I mention this was 2007-ish?). I also played some NES cartridges, since we had (and I still have) a real US breadbin NES. I also grew up playing Game Boy games like Pokemon Blue and Tetris (I have since lost those cartridges) on all of my Game Boys, and was playing GBA games like Harmony of Dissonance and Super Mario Advance 4 on both my Game Boy Advance and DS lite.

That being said, unfortunately, I don't think there's any business opportunities for (S)NES/GB(C/A) programming in 2021, or even back in 2017 when I became old enough to get a part-time job.

I am not interested in developing for modern systems because I know for a fact that those same systems will automatically become obsolete in at least 5+ years. I'm already bad with deadlines and I take too long to do anything, so if I were to work on a PS5 game that isn't rushed, by the time I'm finished, the PS5 would have probably already been discontinued by then.

As for non-game applications, I am not interested in making that either. It's just so boring to contribute a lot of code, break my head, and then find out no one still cares about me after it's all done.

When I was in school, everyone thought I was a computer genius just because I could make PowerPoint games and VBS scripts back then. Keep in mind that PowerPoint games aren't that hard to make due to PowerPoint's hyperlinks, and VBS scripts are literally just text files editable in Notepad that do things once you run them.

By the time I got into high school, I was expected to eventually get a computer science degree in college. Even back then, I knew that I wouldn't be interested in coding for modern computer applications, especially server crap. I often made this very clear that I was specifically interested in coding for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, but even the people who actually knew what a SNES was didn't care and thought I'd be good at coding modern hardware, unaware that coding for extremely old systems and coding for modern systems are nothing alike.

I eventually did take a computer science class for a single semester in college. It was a basic class, where most of it was just people doing Python scripts. I already learned how to do Python back when I was in high school, so I found the class boring. It did start to get interesting when we were learning MIPS ASM and C++, but sadly, that didn't last very long. I eventually dropped out of college, both because I wanted to wait until the Corona was done (which would probably never happen, but that's a story for another time) since I had a hard time paying attention during remote learning, and also because that computer science class I took was literally the only reason I was even going to college, as I was not interested in any of the other classes that were all about how life sucks and some shite, and I wanted job interviewers to take me seriously so that I could get enough $ to buy a fucking home of any kind(I really, really want to move out of the apartment I already live in, but that's also a story for another time and perhaps another website).

I probably wouldn't mind working on someone else's project if I'm also interested in it, because I am well aware of how I cannot finish anything I start on my own. Believe me, I've found that out so many times the hard way. How important is it to work on homebrew games and finish them by yourself, anyway?

Yeah, modern programming being too abstracted from real hardware, and modern hardware being too complicated, those are huge reasons I'm not interested in programming for modern systems. I really enjoy the SNES' hardware and I also enjoy the hardware of other ancient systems as well, so to see there being tricks done on them that I never would have thought up, or tricks I have thought up but have never seen in action, really appeals to me. I did grow up watching demoscenes on YouTube, after all. Though I really wish we can make tools and tutorials that make it easier for new programmers to get into developing for real ancient computers and consoles so that we can see more games for them come out.

My interests do change a bit when I age, to be fair. Back when I was 11 in 2014, I was a huge weeb and was into weird anime art styles. Back when I was 12 in 2015, I was into FNAF lore and Vine memes. Back when I was 13 in 2016, I was already devoting too much of my life poking fun at the UT2015 fanbase. My interests still constantly change to this day.
It kind of sucks not knowing what you'll eventually grow out of and what you won't grow out of. I'm sure a lot of people I used to know (who didn't have to cut me off) would be so disappointed to see that I'm still into modern games for retro systems, or modern music for retro sound chips, and also the fact that I still enjoy YTMND and 2000s internet culture.

I am currently a NEET, too busy spending his time watching DogeJoshua and working on-and-off on random crap to actually focus on 1 thing and get it done.
93143 wrote:
Fri Mar 26, 2021 3:28 pm
I keep thinking that it would be cool to start a business making SNES games with a small team of dedicated enthusiasts. But I'm not at all sure the market is there for the sort of projects I want to do, and I fear that once it became my job I'd lose interest (or perhaps being forced to finish something would drain my enthusiasm). On the other hand, my projects list is now so long that if it stays a hobby I'm guaranteed to never finish it without medical life extension/anti-aging technology...

I don't know how programmers are trained nowadays, but I wonder if it would be useful to start them with assembly on really primitive hardware (punch cards?), and not let them touch C until they've understood how compilers work. Introduce Java (if at all) via a deep dive into the interpreter...
Please start a business like that. I would happily join you. I wanna eventually make a cute animesque 3D platformer for the SNES featuring gay rabbits LMAO and I need the experience. No I'm not an furry.
93143 wrote:
Fri Mar 26, 2021 3:28 pm
That reminds me of a silly/impractical idea I had for introducing kids to video games via the Atari 2600, then NES, then SNES/MD, N64/PSX, and so forth, on a somewhat compressed schedule. Then I read a Penny Arcade strip where Tycho does exactly that...
Lol, I can imagine your kid talking with other kids at school or in the neighbourhood, and then they find out about this cool PC game called Fortnite. And then when they come home, I can imagine them saying 'Bruh! Myyyy ohhhh myyyy I founnnnnd Fortniiiiiiiiite!' and then trying to get a $19 Fortnite card.
Ben Boldt wrote:
Fri Mar 26, 2021 9:23 pm
When that happens it is important to ask, what would you rather do, and why don't you do it instead?
I'd probably rather be making early-2000s style anime in 4:3 DVD-quality 480p, but I don't do it because it takes too much work lol.
Drag wrote:
Sat Mar 27, 2021 5:56 pm
I bounce back and forth between like 10 hobbies, not all are CS/programming related, so my interest waxes and wanes, but I'll always return to programming or technology at some point, even if it's a year later.
Same.

I try to program for SNES, but I also love making music for the SNES and NES and OPL3, and I love drawing low-res debatably anime-ish art too, but most of my time is spent playing games for retro systems, and watching old anime from the 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s(like the Mr. My Dad Is A Doge And I Use A Well To Time Travel And It's Not Like I Love You Or Anything!! one I mentioned earlier).
Drag wrote:
Sat Mar 27, 2021 5:56 pm
And yeah, programming isn't always going to be glamorous demoscene things like cramming extra colors on screen or doing fancy hardware tricks. Sometimes, the satisfying challenge challenge is from designing the architecture the program's going to use to do something really basic, or successfully finding and integrating a library. The challenge is sometimes just getting your stuff to work at all.
Yeah, sometimes the challenge is getting a game working at all, and then the challenge becomes having the game be fun to play, and then the challenge becomes fighting with people who expect some boy to match the expectations of an entire Square Enix team.
Drag wrote:
Sat Mar 27, 2021 5:56 pm
As much as I'd love a job that I can flex all of my hobbyist interests in, there just aren't any, so the programming day-job is going to seem boring or repetitive, but if you can find one that pays well and gives you options for remote work, you should try going for it for the stable income and healthcare, and then you can pretend you'll have enough energy to do stuff in your spare time, like me! :D
I wouldn't recommend pretending to have enough energy to do things in your free time. If I did that, people would have high expectations of me that I cannot dream of matching. So I just come clean and admit I am too lazy to do anything new.
Bregalad wrote:
Mon Mar 29, 2021 2:26 am
Being interested in something has nothing to do with it being easy or hard ! On the other hand, something being somehow "hard" is necessary to make it interesting at all.
Sometimes you can be interested in something because it is hard, so there is some correlation.

Then again, something being easy can also be interesting, but it'd be because you'd be pushing your creativity.

I especially need to push my creativity, as a lot of the people I draw are just Generic Guys and the occasional woman.
Last edited by Nikku4211 on Sun Apr 18, 2021 10:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Loss of interest for computer scinence, anyone else ?

Post by KayBur » Mon Mar 29, 2021 7:31 am

Bregalad wrote:
Fri Mar 26, 2021 3:22 am
So guys it's hard to explain but I wonder if any other of my nesdev mates experienced something similar as I do these last years.

Since I'm a young teenager (11-ish) I've been interested in computers, coding, etc... and decided to make it both a hobby and a living of it. But since the last 2-3 years or so I find it more and more boring, in a way that's hard to explain with words (even even moreso in English as a French-speaker). It's hard to put a finger on what exactly is going wrong, nevertheless I'll make an attempt :
  • No interest on working on someone else's projects rather than mine (even if I'm paid well)
  • Feel like I've leanred all that I could learn and would rather spend time learning something on another topic rather than "apply" what I've learned about IT/CS.
  • Modern software developement lack any hardware tricks or challenge there is on retro platforms
  • Modern software development is too abstract and far to the hardware - on the other hand modern hardware is too miniaturized and too complex to be understandable and to be played with
  • It's not motivating to contribute to something that is too complex so I don't understand the big picture of
  • It's not motivating to contribute to something that is going to trash a few years later at best
  • It might be that entering in my 30s my center of interests simply change due to my own aging
Has anyone else experienced something similar (I'm looking at you Koitsu)? If so did you switch for another job, and if so what career path did you take? Or have you found a way to re-interest yourself in computer science by changing directions within this diverse field?

(Edit : To make it clear I'm talking about a long-term, year-scale loss of interest, not something that might just happen for a couple of weeks that anyone can naturally experience)
Forcing yourself to do something by force is the path to burnout. You need to either find a new goal that will motivate you to study, or simply re-evaluate your priorities. Perhaps computer science is not your calling, you need to find something new.

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Re: Loss of interest for computer scinence, anyone else ?

Post by Bregalad » Mon Mar 29, 2021 12:57 pm

Forcing yourself to do something by force is the path to burnout.
Oh don't worry, I'm very, very far from burning out (if anything I'm closer to boring out).
I've been into the SNES hardware since I was a 4 year old in 2007
Wow and I though I was among the younger folks there ! But I'm almost twice as old as you are :)
That being said, unfortunately, I don't think there's any business opportunities for (S)NES/GB(C/A) programming in 2021, or even back in 2017 when I became old enough to get a part-time job.
I never ever sought to do game development for a living, and I always knew it wasn't worth the trouble, so I never pursued that goal. My goal was to use to "ordinary" software or embedded-software development for a career.
When I was in school, everyone thought I was a computer genius just because I could make PowerPoint games and VBS scripts back then.
Yeah, back when it was easy to be a genius, but later on your realize in the adult world it's more difficult. Welcome to the club.

I didn't understand your whole post but apparently like me your center(s) of interest seems to rotate every semester or so. That's actually almost an handicaping feature for those of us who work like that... Because no matter which center of interest we base our career on, it'll eventually bore us.

You're the second (after Tokumaru) mentionning drawing. I had a time when I was interested in that but I completely dropped the idea, why not give it a little revival ! The issue with art (of any kind) is that either you're a genius and your art will eventually be known, or it's just a complete waste of time because it won't ever be used. I know it sucks but that's the way the world we're living in works.
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Re: Loss of interest for computer scinence, anyone else ?

Post by Drag » Mon Mar 29, 2021 4:24 pm

About modern platforms, don't be so quick to write them off as limitless and therefore boring. If you just want to write a game, you're looking at several game engines you can use, like Game Maker, Clickteam Fusion, Godot, etc, and all of those come with their own limitations that you can work within (and surpass).

The random layman may not be aware of why your PC game is impressive, but the community surrounding the development environment you chose will know. This is the exact thing that happens among retro enthusiasts as well. At the end of the day, you'll also wind up with a game that doesn't require hobbyist hardware to run (like an old video game console, flash cart, FPGA-based solution, etc), but rather a regular PC.

I understand though, the allure is sometimes working with specialized hardware and seeing something you made displayed on a TV, running on a device that is neither a computer nor a mobile device. That's part of being a hobbyist, and nothing will replace it, but also don't wall yourself off from checking the modern stuff out too. :P

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Re: Loss of interest for computer scinence, anyone else ?

Post by 93143 » Mon Mar 29, 2021 11:46 pm

Drag wrote:
Mon Mar 29, 2021 4:24 pm
About modern platforms, don't be so quick to write them off as limitless and therefore boring. If you just want to write a game, you're looking at several game engines you can use, like Game Maker, Clickteam Fusion, Godot, etc, and all of those come with their own limitations that you can work within (and surpass).
I don't think that's the issue. For me, at least, it's not about modern computers having no limits; it's that it's hard to feel out and approach those limits because (a) the hardware is insanely complicated, (b) there's too much software in the way, and (c) the hardware is on a short road to obsolescence. Those game engines you mention are essentially (b).

(It is also true that modern computers are powerful enough that one person would have a hard time fully exploiting one regardless. Whole companies have had trouble with this; it's why the jump to HD knocked so many Japanese game makers flat, and why western developers all make the same three games over and over. Hobbyists can at best make demos that use the computer's full power efficiently, or games that don't.)

The SNES has none of those problems - it's simple, it's bare metal, and it's already an obsolete (if well-regarded) historical artifact. It also has the advantage of being something that I loved when I was small.

Maybe it's a bit arbitrary making such a distinction between hardware and software, but that's how I feel, which is important when choosing a hobby...

93143 wrote:
Fri Mar 26, 2021 3:28 pm
You would never program a game in Matlab.
I have written a perspective-correct texture mapper in Octave (i.e. free Matlab). This image took two and a half seconds to render on a 2.5 GHz Centrino Duo:

checkerwall.bmp
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Re: Loss of interest for computer scinence, anyone else ?

Post by Gilbert » Tue Mar 30, 2021 2:14 am

Awww Matlab. Reminds me of the questionable good old time. My undergraduate project was on pattern recognition using artificial neural networks, and I ran some simulations using Matlab, typically a number of matrix operations and the best computers the faculty lab could offer was 80486 PCs with at most 64MB RAM I think (it was the early 1990s) which obviously would explode before 1% of the task was even done, so I ran the simulation by telneting to the university workstation (some powerful unix system they claimed) and ran Matlab there, Overnight. Over. Night. (Nowadays it probably finishes within seconds on a cheap phone.) When I checked the next day, it crashed, and I eventually had to split the simulation into tiny sessions and ran one session each time. I wrote in my project report: Matlab was extremely slow and resource hungry and is only good for simulation. For real application DO NOT USE MATLAB. Use something else that are better!
(Note: This was a Maths project as I majored in Maths, not CS.)

I think one problem with Computer Science is that nowadays you may not actually need to learn soft/hardware architecture and programming to make something (at least not low level programming like assembly or even C++, unless you get very serious and develop your own engine, etc.). There are already plenty of tools and engine to use, i.e. you basically create contents to feed them to pre-existing platforms. (In the past, creating just contents might not be enough, as there might not be pre-existing engines/platforms suited enough to bring these contents to use in your own vision.)

Also, computer courses in the past were more like hobby courses, especially those for non-CS major people (like me). Over my undergraduate studies I've taken three computer courses. One was about basic Pascal, another about very basic C++, and the last... COBOL the ULTIMATE DAMNIT LIFESTYLE FOR THE ELEGANCE (besides the main culprit of the millennium bug). As it was early 1990s no computer was involved. The programming courses were basically taught with printed notes and homeworks were pen-and-paper only. They're like, "Write a C++ programme to sort a list" and we were encouraged to run the programme for real and check the output (we usually obtained the limited educational version of Turbo Pascal/C++ or just pirat... shared the thing), but you know, if you're good enough you didn't need to check with a computer, you just wrote the programme and the expected legit outputs on the paper. For COBOL no-one taking the course (cared to) check with a real computer (as no-one (cared to) know how to run a COBOL programme anyway) so everyone just wrote gibberish codes and didn't even care whether they worked.

KayBur
Posts: 12
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2021 6:47 am

Re: Loss of interest for computer scinence, anyone else ?

Post by KayBur » Tue Mar 30, 2021 6:30 am

Oh don't worry, I'm very, very far from burning out (if anything I'm closer to boring out).
It's good if you are confident that there is no burnout. It manifests itself in each person individually. For many, through boredom, unwillingness to do anything, lack of concentration. In a neglected state, drowsiness and lethargy appear - the central nervous system, when overloaded, goes into "energy saving mode".

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