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Soundtracks recorded with real hardware?
http://forums.nesdev.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=12476
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Author:  Jedi QuestMaster [ Sun Mar 15, 2015 7:38 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Soundtracks recorded with real hardware?

jsr wrote:
I can provide recordings from a TNS-HFC cart, with any type of expansion audio. I don't know how well it's compatible with game soundtrack NSFs, but if there's a particular one you'd like to hear then I can find out.


I'd eventually like my entire collection of classical covers converted to audio for a CD soundtrack. 8-)

Here are two VRC6 pieces:
Anitra's Dance
Danse Macabre

Do those work? :shock:

Author:  jsr [ Tue Mar 17, 2015 2:22 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Soundtracks recorded with real hardware?

Jedi QuestMaster wrote:
Do those work? :shock:

Yeah those works fine, I've uploaded the result here:

Anitra's Dance
Danse Macabre

But I kind of had ripped game OSTs in mind, as I assume that was the purpose of this thread. Contact me in private if you want recordings of more original music.

Author:  Myask [ Wed Mar 18, 2015 12:21 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Soundtracks recorded with real hardware?

dogman91 wrote:
Does anyone know of anyone that is doing [...] equipment specs for his project [...]
SOURCE: Modded front-loading NES / dual-channel audio recorded directly from 2A03 chip
AUDIO CAPTURE HARDWARE: Amplified by FiiO E6, captured by Sound Blaster X-Fi Surround 5.1 Pro
AUDIO CAPTURE SOFTWARE: Audacity 2.0.3

I sense discord.

Author:  cak [ Fri Mar 20, 2015 12:38 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Soundtracks recorded with real hardware?

On a slightly related note, I'd be interested to know what the audible differences are between emulated expansion audio on Power Pak (using a resistor/potentiometer mod) and actual Famicom hardware. I'm aware there's differences in volume (due to expansion-specific hardware mixing), but is there anything significant beyond that?

Also, is there a document out there with reference dB levels for each chip? I seem to recall such a document existing but am having a hard time with Google.

Author:  rainwarrior [ Fri Mar 20, 2015 1:14 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Soundtracks recorded with real hardware?

cak wrote:
Also, is there a document out there with reference dB levels for each chip? I seem to recall such a document existing but am having a hard time with Google.

I put a statement on each expansion chip article in the Wiki comparing their output volumes to the 2A03's output. (It's a little incomplete, still, but otherwise you can try to match the reference recordings I made, or derive levels from the NSFPlay source code.)

Author:  drummerdave4689 [ Wed Apr 06, 2016 4:14 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Soundtracks recorded with real hardware?

You should check out the 16-Bit Audiophile Project over at 16bap.theclassicgamer.net.

Author:  RushJet1 [ Tue Apr 12, 2016 10:02 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Soundtracks recorded with real hardware?

I recorded my most recent 2A03 album on my PowerPak: https://rushjet1.bandcamp.com/album/adv ... f-the-2a03

Stuff recorded from my NES tends to sound warmer than from an emulator.

cak wrote:
On a slightly related note, I'd be interested to know what the audible differences are between emulated expansion audio on Power Pak (using a resistor/potentiometer mod) and actual Famicom hardware. I'm aware there's differences in volume (due to expansion-specific hardware mixing), but is there anything significant beyond that?

Also, is there a document out there with reference dB levels for each chip? I seem to recall such a document existing but am having a hard time with Google.


This is why I went with using a potentiometer so I could adjust volumes on the fly. I have a few calibration nsfs that play 2a03 and expansion squares alternating at the same frequency and volume, and I just adjust the pot until they sound the same.

Author:  tepples [ Tue Apr 12, 2016 10:18 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Soundtracks recorded with real hardware?

"Warmth" in the vinyl sense tends to refer to a low-pass characteristic, which reduces energy in higher frequencies. This sort of warmth can often be replicated in a digital audio editor with an equalizer.

But one benefit of recording with hardware is that the channel volumes will at least be within normal limits. A lot of emulators and trackers get channel volume balance subtly wrong.

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