practicle uses for overclocking?

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herr_prof
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practicle uses for overclocking?

Post by herr_prof » Sun Dec 26, 2004 5:18 pm

http://www.epicgaming.uk.ro/nes_oc/

fixes some slow down (think megaman 2) but changes pitch....

peter
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abonetochew
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Post by abonetochew » Sun Dec 26, 2004 9:38 pm

This seems like a good idea for well-behaved games (no PPU trickery), but what about games that use cycle-accurate timing? Battletoads must really suffer with this mod.
- abonetochew

tepples
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Post by tepples » Sun Dec 26, 2004 9:56 pm

Early PC games that needed nearly cycle-accurate timing relied on the "turbo button" on the front panel of early XT and AT models that clocked the system back down to 4.8 MHz. I'm sure a commercialized version of such an NES OC mod would have a button to disable it for games that use cycle-timed effects.

Great Hierophant
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Post by Great Hierophant » Mon Dec 27, 2004 9:56 pm

I know this is off-topic, but I wonder what an overclocking mod for the SNES, which had a notoriously slow 65816, would do? At least the NES had a clock speed on par with the consoles of its day.

tepples
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Post by tepples » Tue Dec 28, 2004 9:06 am

Great Hierophant wrote:I wonder what an overclocking mod for the SNES, which had a notoriously slow 65816, would do?
Hard to tell. Because the Super NES had hblank-triggered DMA, fewer Super NES games relied as heavily on cycle-timed code. For another thing, the 65c816 ran asynchronously from the . But back in Super NES days, ROMs that could respond at 3.6 MHz were expensive, and a lot of games ran from slow memory (at 2.4 MHz or 2.7 MHz or something like that) to get replication costs down.
At least the NES had a clock speed on par with the consoles of its day.
The WDC 65c816 was as fast as the memory. The Sega Genesis's MC68000 ran much slower than the memory, with a lot of so-called "internal operation" cycles.

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