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 Post subject: NES Low-Pass Filter?
PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2018 3:19 pm 
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Hi all,

I am going to RGB mod my NES and I have a question before I begin:
Does the original Nintendo NES use a low-pass filter at all?

Because it seems for the RGB modded NES, there is a chip (THS7374) on it to turn the filter on or off.
Also, I am getting slightly blurry pixels around my sprites that looks to be caused by a low-pass filter or anti-aliasing.
I am just curious really!

Thanks.
Erik W.


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 Post subject: Re: NES Low-Pass Filter?
PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2018 4:22 pm 
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Location: Seattle
The video path in the NES is not filtered inside the NES, but there are very sharp filters imposed by composite decoding and RF demodulation.

The bandwidth of the THS7374 should be high enough (7.3MHz guaranteed minimum) that any blur you can see should be noticeably smaller than an NES pixel (NES pixel clock is 5.4MHz)... it tentatively sounds like the problem you're describing is a defect instead of intentional.


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 Post subject: Re: NES Low-Pass Filter?
PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2018 4:29 pm 
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With composite decoding, are you talking about the two RCA ports on the NES? Or, something else?


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 Post subject: Re: NES Low-Pass Filter?
PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2018 4:43 pm 
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Yeah, the yellow jack on the NES. "Composite" or "CVBS" video has to be separated by your television into color, brightness, and alignment information. It's this stage that imposes bandwidth limits ( = horizontal smeariness) on video.

But the output of the NESRGB kit shouldn't look worse than what you see running the corresponding game in an NES emulator with its "NTSC" filter—if it does then there's something actively wrong.

.... edit: wait, brains, you haven't done the mod yet.

Ok, right. The filter there is for signal processing reasons. Using the filter shouldn't visibly degrade the output and may improve it depending on how your monitor handles video with too-high frequency components. The NESRGB output bandwidth is half (2.7MHz) the pixel rate (5.4MHz); it's more authentic to only pass frequencies of 4.2MHz and below (i.e. horizontal linear interpolation), but including the third harmonic (8.1MHz) will give nice blocky pixels without any problems.

edit: Omitting the filter theoretically could let tiny glitches show up, depending on how the NESRGB handles pixel clock recover and how your monitor handles 240p component video.


Last edited by lidnariq on Thu Dec 27, 2018 4:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: NES Low-Pass Filter?
PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2018 4:49 pm 
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Joined: Thu Dec 27, 2018 3:06 pm
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Thanks for your help!

I am actually using the Framemeister XRGB-mini.

I did notice that if I use S-Video instead of Composite, the image quality looks better.
Even if I just convert the NES yellow jack right away to S-Video, and plug in a S-Video cable into this and into the Framemesiter, that the image looks better. The picture looks sharper, which is interesting.


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 Post subject: Re: NES Low-Pass Filter?
PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2018 4:56 pm 
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You're using the XRGB Mini to convert from the NES's composite output to S-video? There's a lot of tricks—I might even go as far as to say black magic—in separating the color data from the brightness data, and the XRGB Mini is likely doing something different (and better for old consoles) than your TV is.


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 Post subject: Re: NES Low-Pass Filter?
PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2018 5:01 pm 
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Yes, I hooked up a RCA to S-Video adapter to the NES yellow port. I hooked up a Monster S-Video cable to the XRGB-mini and to the NES RCA/S-Video adapter, and it looks way better!
If you then also convert the S-Video back to Composite with an adapter, and hook that into the Framemeister, it looks worse!
Just interesting.


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 Post subject: Re: NES Low-Pass Filter?
PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2018 5:17 pm 
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Yeah, that's consistent. The TV's composite video input is probably optimized for real imagery, where the contents of each horizontal row are strongly correlated with the lines above and below and also in the past and the future. Furthermore, it probably expects interlaced input, not compositeprogressive. (Assuming you have a modern LCD HDTV and not an old CRT SDTV)

Almost all of the assumptions that are correct for old real images don't hold for old consoles, especially fewer-color ones like the NES.

When you took the composite video from the NES, the XRGB Mini separates out color in one way. This way is not necessarily going to produce identical results to the original when you mix the color signal back onto the brightness signal... so it follows that the TV will do something different then.


Last edited by lidnariq on Thu Dec 27, 2018 6:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: NES Low-Pass Filter?
PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2018 5:25 pm 
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Yea, I have a TCL 49S403 4K HDR TV. It is big and all, which rules for video gaming. If you plug the NES into the TV directly, the picture looks really bad. So, I bought the $400 XGRB-mini upscaler, and it looks way better. I plugged the NES into the Framemeister, and hooked an HDMI cable between the upscaler and the TV. It looks 10x better this way.


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 Post subject: Re: NES Low-Pass Filter?
PostPosted: Fri Dec 28, 2018 11:59 am 
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Another comment I would like to add is that I am going to eventually buy a RGB modded Nintendo NES!

They say that this mod makes the NES look WAY better.
I suspect the reason for this is that there is no demodulation, ie there is only one signal per wire.
The wires are Red, Green, Blue, Horizontal, and Vertical.

Because, when I use S-Video instead of composite, it looks better because the S-Video separates the Chroma and Luminance, so you don't have to demodulate these, and there is one less demodulation step (than composite), so the picture is way sharper.

Thanks for your help!
Erik W.


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 Post subject: Re: NES Low-Pass Filter?
PostPosted: Fri Dec 28, 2018 4:00 pm 
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Right, but the nes doesnt natively output S-video, so you wouldn't actually get any improvements over composite if you used a converter. That being said, composite -> s-video convertors often have something called a "comb filter", something which your tv might lack, which takes out some of the noise.

Your hypothesis on RGB looking much better because the signals are never modulated is correct.


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 Post subject: Re: NES Low-Pass Filter?
PostPosted: Fri Dec 28, 2018 4:26 pm 
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Jeroen wrote:
Right, but the nes doesn't natively output S-video, so you wouldn't actually get any improvements over composite if you used a converter.
That's completely missing the point. You even mention this afterwards:
Quote:
That being said, composite -> s-video converters often have something called a "comb filter", something which your tv might lack, which takes out some of the noise.
There are more different ways to separate out the brightness from the color signals than you can shake a stick at.

Every NTSC decoder does this differently.

A "comb filter" is nothing more, and nothing less, than assuming that the color on one scanline is roughly the same as the colors on the scanlines above and below. Sometimes this is a safe assumption. Sometimes it is not. For consoles with large areas of the same color (e.g. 2600), or gradual gradients (N64 and better?), it's a safe assumption.

For consoles with limited master palettes and new colors every scanline (SMS, NES, maybe others?), it's almost certainly not a safe assumption.

A "3d" comb filter adds the assumption that, after the TV detects specific motions in the video, that it can assume that the colors in the near future and past are also consistent. This usually adds unacceptable lag for gaming.

The TV is using a different method to separate out color from brightness than the XRGB mini. Hence the perceived better results. There isn't a single optimal NTSC decoder that will give desirable results for all inputs.



One gotcha for using full component video, instead of S-video or composite, is that artists working with the NES's limitations took advantage of its limited color bandwidth. (Only a change in color every two pixels can be encoded: the color portion of anything that changes more often will be blurred)


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