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PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2015 2:40 pm 
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You might be able to use another socket as a riser for the NESRGB board, giving you the needed clearance.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2015 4:40 pm 
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The low-profile machine screw strips, combined with flush-cutting the bottom pins on the NESRGB adapter board, finished off with a layer of hot glue to insulate them, and I think I can call it safe. And with that, I have it all hooked back up with a new CPU/PPU, and it works! The NESRGB is completely unharmed. Now I can get back to wiring up my 3D printed back panel :D

Thanks for the help, guys. It was pretty straightforward stuff, but it always helps to have a dialog going while troubleshooting to keep ideas flowing and keep from doing something stupid.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2015 6:20 pm 
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qwertymodo wrote:
my 3D printed back panel :D
Pictures when you're done? :)


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2015 7:54 pm 
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Image
Image
Image


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2015 8:10 pm 
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Oh, that's pretty. Using a Wii component cable?


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2015 9:34 pm 
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lidnariq wrote:
Oh, that's pretty. Using a Wii component cable?


Yep (well, Wii RGB cable right now), reasons being that 1) the SNES multi-out doesn't have component, and 2) Wii cables are easier and cheaper to find than OEM SNES cables, and half of the 3rd party SNES cables you can get these days are complete garbage. Wii can do either S-Video/Component (NTSC pinout) or RGB/Component (PAL pinout), in addition to composite (composite video is used as the RGB sync signal). Right now I have RGB wired up, but eventually I'd really like to get RGB and component both working at the same time. I'm working on building a video switching circuit to support the dual output (each of the signal pairs shares the same 3 pins on the connector, and the cable indicates which one to use by shorting a pair of pins to select component).


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2015 9:54 am 
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Here's the clearance issue area:

Image

That's with a super low-profile machine screw strip. A normal socket is much taller, and the pins on the adapter board originally stuck down quite a bit. They were basically touching the corners of the CPU legs.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2015 6:45 pm 
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Comparison photos, because I managed to steal my coworker's tripod long enough to get decent shots. Click for full size. Getting good photos of CRT screens is hard...

Original PPU Composhite output:
Image


NESRGB (RGB output, natural palette), look at the much sharper text, the border around the brown background, and the clearer color of the sky:
Image


NESRGB (RGB output, improved palette). Just... yes. So much yes. The photo doesn't even begin to do it justice:
Image


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2015 9:33 am 
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Also, while I had the thing apart, I took the time to actually measure the current draw with the NESRGB in place, and it ran pretty steadily at 390mA with the game cart and a single controller. With a 1.5A regulator, that should still be plenty of headroom for a PowerPak or anything else you might want to throw at it, without the need for the secondary regulator. Not sure why Mario is blue, the meter must've introduced some noise to the power rail or something weird like that. The game played fine.

Image


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2015 9:38 am 
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Mario is pipe/bush colored. This means the RGB mod is using the background palette with the same number as the sprite palette. There are only four color output pins, not enough to distinguish the background palette from the sprite palette. For this reason, the typical modern RGB mod uses the PPU's composite output to distinguish background pixels from sprite pixels. Something is causing this composite output not to get through.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2015 12:07 pm 
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Sounds about right, from what I was seeing elsewhere. Taking the meter out and hooking the Vout pin back into the mainboard took care of the problem though. So maybe the PPU wasn't functioning for some reason, which might imply that the actual current consumption was higher than what I was measuring, but even then I think it's pretty clear that there's plenty of headroom on a single 1.5A regulator, which was all I really cared about in testing this.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2016 9:50 am 
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qwertymodo wrote:
Image
Image
Image



This part is so beautiful! did you make it yourself? also the little board that goes on it did you make the whole thing? how are you wiring that thing up to your NES RGB card?


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